Easy Glide to Organizational Bliss

Standard

I’m still working on items for the Home Office Makeover and not ready to reveal anything new…. yet!

So, let’s step back in time for a project I did earlier in January.  How about custom Cabinet Glide Out Shelves?  They are easy to make and add such convenience and value to your kitchen.

Let me show you how.

Before Pic

Yep, this is my BEFORE cabinet.  An organizational nightmare!

Get Your Measurements

To plan your shelf size, you will need two measurements:  The depth of the cabinet (from front to back) and the width of the opening.   Mine was about 22.75″ deep and 17″ wide.  When measuring the opening you will need to account for the 1/2″ that each slide will need to clear the cabinet sides.  So the front and back of the drawer will need to be cut only 16.5″ wide to allow the slides to clear the sides of the cabinet.  The sides of the drawer will need to be 22″ deep.

Material List

Front & Sides:

1x4x8 – wood of your choice (I chose Poplar)

Bottom:

1/2″  sheet of birch plywood (router version)

1/4″ sheet of birch plywood (non-router version)

Slides:

22″ full extension drawer slides (100 lbs load rated)

There will be two options in the plans below.  My original plans include the use of a router (to inset the bottom into grooves cut into the shelf sides) and a pocket hole jig (for tighter joints).  Not many people have these items, so I will provide a modified version too.

The Basic Frame

Cut The Sides

In the case of the measurements mentioned above, the front and back pieces will be 16.5 and the side pieces will be 1.5″ less than the 22″ depth measurement to make allowances for the 3/4″ width on the front and back pieces. Therefore, the side pieces will be cut to 20.5″ or if you insetting the bottom, then cut 21.25″.  Use the 1x4x8 board to make these cuts.

These pieces can be cut with a hand saw, a jig saw, a miter saw, or a table saw.  I always cut the raw end to ensure that it is square before marking my measurements.

Miter Saw

Router The Front & Sides

If you don’t have a router, then skip this step.

With a 1/2″ router bit, rout a 3/8″ deep groove into each board.  The groove should start at 1/2″ from the bottom of the board.

With a 3/4″ router bit, rout a 3/8″ deep groove at each end of the front and back pieces.

Using a router table to make groove cuts

Cut the Bottom

If you are insetting the bottom, then take measurements within the frame, front to back and then side to side and then add 3/4″ to these two measurements.  Mark and cut the bottom from the 3/4″ plywood with a table saw or jig saw.

If you are not insetting the bottom, then take measurements from the outside of the frame front to back and then side to side.  Mark and cut the bottom from the 1/4″ plywood with a table saw or jig saw.

Assembly

Assemble the Drawer

I used a Pocket Hole Jig to make a pocket hole inside of each end of the front and back pieces (account for the side grooves if insetting the bottom).  Before screwing the front to sides with the pocket hole screws, apply glue to the end of each piece and then screw together.

If insetting the bottom, apply glue to the edges of the bottom piece and slide into the groove till tightly in the groove in the front.  Apply glue to the edges of the back piece and screw into place.  If not using a pocket jig, then use glue and finishing nails to secure the sides.

If not insetting the bottom, then use finishing nails to secure the 1/4″ plywood to the bottom of the frame.

Pocket Hole Jig

Finishing

If using finishing nails, countersink the nails and fill with wood filler and let dry.  Sand.  Apply two or three thin coats of spray lacquer to finish off the drawer.

Dry fit

Installation

Before installing, do a dry fit of the drawer.  I placed the drawer slides to the side of the drawer and made sure they clear the cabinet frame.  In this case, the slides could not be attached to the walls since there was a big gap between the cabinet walls and the slides.  I added some plywood strips until the gaps closed.   Then I screwed the plywood strips into the sides of the cabinet.

Fitting the slides

Finally, following the instructions provided with the slides, I installed the slides to both the drawer and and the plywood strips and inserted the drawer.

Full Extension Drawer Slides

Mission Completed.  This project takes about 2 hours to make.

Organizational Bliss

Now I have easy access to the entire contents of my cabinet.

Total Cost

for two drawers

(2) 1x4x8 = $18

1/2 Sheet of plywood = $13

2 sets of Slides = $44

Total Cost:  $75

Custom Drawers could cost up to $100 for 2 drawers.  You can build these for less than $40 each.  No, really, you can do this!

Wouldn’t you just love to have some custom drawers to make it easier to reach that crock pot lurking in the back of the your cabinet?  Then you can make this awesome dish, 5 Minute Crock Pot Loaded Potato Soup, featured on Sassy2Savvy.com.

Have a great weekend

~Dona~

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One response »

  1. Great article… Makes me want to make drawers for my kitchen… which I so desperately want…. Great job!!

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